Virginia’s historic Black Children’s School receives a $ 5 million grant

On Friday, officials announced that the foundation had donated $ 5 million to efforts to preserve a colonial-era school where enslaved and free black children were taught in Virginia.

On Friday, officials announced that the foundation had donated $ 5 million to efforts to preserve a colonial-era school where enslaved and free black children were taught in Virginia.

The money comes from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Humanitarian philanthropy, based in New York, is funding similar projects across the country aimed at expanding the representation of historically forgotten communities.

The Bray School raised hundreds of black children from 1760 to 1774 in Williamsburg. William and Mary College and Colonial Williamsburg are now working together to renovate and relocate the building.

The school house is considered to be the only colonial-era building in the country dedicated to educating black children. Its mission was to provide a Christian education along with a “deeply erroneous goal of directing prisoners to accept their circumstances as God-ordained,” the university and museum said in a statement.

Researchers determined the frame of the building last year. It is currently housed in a modern building on the William & Mary campus. It will be relocated a few blocks to Colonial Williamsburg, which will include the school building in its public history.

The restoration of the Bray School “will help us tell a fuller history of the complex history of our country’s race, religion and education,” said Cliff Fleet, president and CEO of the museum.

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