Three former police officers have been convicted of violating the rights in the murder of George Floyd

ST. Paul, Minnesota (AP) – Three former Minneapolis police officers have been convicted of violating George Floyd’s civil rights.

Tu Tao, J. Alexander Queng and Thomas Lane were charged with depriving Floyd of his right to medical care when Officer Derek Chauvin pressed Floyd’s neck to his knees for 9 1/2 minutes when a 46-year-old black man was handcuffed and face down on May 25, 2020.

Tao and Lane were also accused of not interfering to stop Shaven.

The video of the murder sparked protests in Minneapolis that spread across the globe in retaliation for racial injustice. Shavin was found guilty of murder last year in state court and pleaded guilty in December to a federal case.

Queng knelt on Floyd’s back, Lane holding his legs and Tao holding passersby.

Queng and Lane both said they treated Shawen as a senior officer at the scene. Tao testified that he relied on other officers to take care of Floyd’s medical needs because his attention was elsewhere.

A conviction for a violation of federal civil rights that results in death is punishable by life imprisonment or even death, but such sentences are extremely rare.

THIS IS AN UPDATE OF NEWS. The previous history of the AP is given below.

ST. Paul, Minion (AP) – A jury on Thursday handed down a verdict in a federal trial over three fired Minneapolis police officers accused of violating the civil rights of George Floyd when he was pressed to the ground for 9 and a half minutes when fellow officer Derek Shaven pressed his knee to his neck.

The verdict of the jury was made after a two-day discussion of the case against Tou Tao, J. Alexander Cueng and Thomas Lane. Will be read soon.

Former officers are accused of depriving Floyd of the right to medical care. Kueng and Tao are also accused of failing to intervene to stop Shaven during a video of the May 25, 2020 murder of a 46-year-old black man that sparked protests around the world and a review of racism and police.

Tao restrained passers-by. Queng and Lane helped restrain Floyd.

During the month-long trial, prosecutors tried to show that officers violated their training, including if they failed to transfer Floyd or do CPR for him. Prosecutors claimed that Floyd’s condition was so severe that even passers-by without basic medical training could see that he needed help.

The defense said their training was insufficient and that officers considered Shaven as a senior officer at the scene.

Prosecutors told jurors during their closing arguments that three officers “decided to do nothing” when Shaven squeezed the life out of a 46-year-old black man. Defendants argued that the officers were too inexperienced, not properly trained and did not intentionally violate Floyd’s rights.

On Thursday morning, several protesters stood outside the courthouse holding large signs, including one who mocked officers who said, “If only I had a brain, a heart, nerves.” It was decorated with images of the Scarecrow, the Tin Man and the Cowardly Lion from The Wizard of Oz.

All 12 members of the jury – eight women and four men – appears to be white, although the court did not release demographics such as race or age. A woman who appears to be of Asian descent was released on Tuesday without explanation; a man who seems to be of Asian descent, remains as an alternative if one of the current 12 cannot continue.

Lane is white, Queng is black, and Tao is an American Hmong.

This is in stark contrast to the jury that heard the state murder case against Cheven. This jury was half white and half non-white.

The federal jury pool was selected from across the state, which includes areas much more conservative and less diverse than the Minneapolis district from which Shaven’s Jury was drawn. Shaven was convicted of murder and manslaughter and later pleaded guilty to the federal civil rights prosecution.

During the month-long trial, prosecutors tried to show that officers violated training, including when they failed to turn Floyd aside and not do CPR for him. They claimed that Floyd’s condition was so severe that even passers-by without basic medical training could see that he needed help.

But the defense said the training of the Minneapolis Police Department was insufficient and that officers given to Chauvin as a senior officer at the scene.

Shavin and Tao went to the scene to help newcomers Kueng and Lane after they answered a call that Floyd had used a counterfeit $ 20 bill at a store on the corner. Floyd was fighting officers when they tried to put him in a police SUV.

Tao watched passers-by and vehicles as Kueng knelt on Floyd’s back while Lane held him by the legs.

Jurors are not isolated – isolated from outside influences that may sway their opinion – which is sometimes done when they stay in hotels during a discussion. They are allowed to watch videos from the scene and view other evidence as much as they want during the discussion.

Federal civil rights violations that result in death are punishable by life imprisonment or even death, but these sentences are extremely rare, and federal sentencing guidelines suggest that officers will receive much less if convicted.

Lane, Queng and Tao a separate trial will also be held in June on state charges that they facilitated murder and manslaughter.

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