Global response to the UN climate report

BERLIN – A group of scientists convened by the United Nations has published a report on the impact climate change had, is and will have on the planet, including in the world of nature and human civilization. A report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change states that almost half of the world’s population already faces a significant risk of global warming.

His findings provoked a strong response from officials, scientists and climate activists, as well as calls from governments to step up ahead of this year’s UN Climate Conference, known as COP27.

Here are some comments after the release of the report.

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“Today’s IPCC report is an atlas of human suffering and a condemnation of the failed climate leadership. In fact, this report shows how climate change is killing people and the planet. Uncontrolled carbon pollution is forcing the most vulnerable people in the world on the march of frogs to destruction – now. The facts are indisputable. This renunciation of leadership is criminal. The world’s biggest polluters are to blame for setting fire to our only home. – Antonio Guterres, UN Secretary General.

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“This IPCC report is a fire alarm for the planet. We all know we are in a climate crisis, but it is a wake-up call that we are also facing an adaptation crisis. … The rich, polluting global north has changed the planet through the burning of fossil fuels and is now refusing to help those suffering the consequences. ” – Mohamed Adov, Director of the Climate Analytical Center Power Shift Africa.

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“The consequences of inaction will be catastrophic. You can’t read this report and believe in anything else. Given that at least 3.3 billion people are very vulnerable to climate change, it is possible to justify no less than the most extreme measures to reduce emissions and adapt to this crisis. – Simon Steele, Grenada’s Minister for Climate Sustainability.

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“The findings of the IPCC report sound like a nightmare, but they are a daily reality for families across Kenya and the world south. We are forced to experience the effects of climate every day: severe droughts, water and food crises. More than 1.4 million animals have died due to the current drought, which has cost farmers the only means of keeping their families. We are afraid that children will soon die of thirst and hunger. ” – Susan Otieno, CEO of ActionAid Kenya.

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“We will have to make a difficult choice. What fires do we just let burn because we don’t have the equipment to go around? ” – Linda Mirnes, climatologist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research and reviewer of the North America report section.

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“I really hope that people who read this report will see how many opportunities we have, opportunities to adapt, if we start to really, really massively reduce our carbon footprint.” – Daniela Schmidt, IPCC Europe Coordinator and Professor of Paleobiology, University of Bristol.

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“We keep going to the precipice – we say our eyes are open to risk, but if you look at global emissions, we are accelerating to the edge of the precipice.” – Walton Webson, Antiguan diplomat and chairman of the Alliance of Small Island Powers.

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“Denial and delay are not strategies, they are a recipe for disaster. Fortunately, we have an action plan. The world’s best scientists have shown us that we need to accelerate adaptation measures on an urgent and large-scale basis. ” – John Kerry, US Climate Envoy.

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“One of the most striking conclusions of our report is that we see that the adverse effects are much more widespread and much more negative than expected in previous reports.” -Camille Parmesan, co-author of the report and director of research at the station of experimental and theoretical ecology CNRS in France.

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“These various risks are expected to increase rapidly for most Americans by the middle of the century. These risks will lead to irreversible changes in ecosystems, increase damage to infrastructure and housing, and cause tensions in economic sectors and disrupt livelihoods, mental health, physical health and security. ” – Cheryl Harper of the University of Alberta, co-author of the North America section.

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“The report makes it clear that there is insufficient financial, managerial and institutional support to adapt and eliminate losses and damage. Rich countries need to increase funding to enable developing countries to prepare for the inevitable effects of climate change, ”said Harjit Singh, senior adviser at Climate Action Network International.

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“Wealthier countries have significant responsibility for climate action, including drastic reductions in emissions, compensation for losses and damage they have caused, and rapid increases in funding for climate-vulnerable developing countries.” – Rachel Clitus, Political Director and Chief Economist of the Union of Interested Scientists.

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